themadpattern:

Ampera Six Building by Chrystalline Architect
Photo: William Kalengkongan

theparisreview:

“Even if these shelters are seldom used, it’s still a pleasure to imagine them out there, flecking the Austrian countryside. Greyhound: take notes.”

Dan Piepenbring on Krumbach’s new BUS:STOP project, where seven international architects have designed Buswartehüsle, or “small shelters.”

(via seeinglandscapes)

prostheticknowledge:

Solar FREAKIN’ Roadways!

A working solar panel system designed for roads that can harvest solar energy and illustrate public spaces with LEDs. This has already done the news rounds, but the attention to functional details and environmental production certainly deserve attention - video embedded below:

Solar Roadways is a modular paving system of solar panels that can withstand the heaviest of trucks (250,000 pounds). These Solar Road Panels can be installed on roads, parking lots, driveways, sidewalks, bike paths, playgrounds… literally any surface under the sun. They pay for themselves primarily through the generation of electricity, which can power homes and businesses connected via driveways and parking lots. A nationwide system could produce more clean renewable energy than a country uses as a whole (http://solarroadways.com/numbers.shtml). They have many other features as well, including: heating elements to stay snow/ice free, LEDs to make road lines and signage, and attached Cable Corridor to store and treat stormwater and provide a “home” for power and data cables. EVs will be able to charge with energy from the sun (instead of fossil fuels) from parking lots and driveways and after a roadway system is in place, mutual induction technology will allow for charging while driving. 

More Here

prostheticknowledge:

Solar FREAKIN’ Roadways!

A working solar panel system designed for roads that can harvest solar energy and illustrate public spaces with LEDs. This has already done the news rounds, but the attention to functional details and environmental production certainly deserve attention - video embedded below:

Solar Roadways is a modular paving system of solar panels that can withstand the heaviest of trucks (250,000 pounds). These Solar Road Panels can be installed on roads, parking lots, driveways, sidewalks, bike paths, playgrounds… literally any surface under the sun. They pay for themselves primarily through the generation of electricity, which can power homes and businesses connected via driveways and parking lots. A nationwide system could produce more clean renewable energy than a country uses as a whole (http://solarroadways.com/numbers.shtml). They have many other features as well, including: heating elements to stay snow/ice free, LEDs to make road lines and signage, and attached Cable Corridor to store and treat stormwater and provide a “home” for power and data cables. EVs will be able to charge with energy from the sun (instead of fossil fuels) from parking lots and driveways and after a roadway system is in place, mutual induction technology will allow for charging while driving. 

More Here

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

It is common in many industries to use oil as a defoamer to break up existing foams or prevent foams from forming. But with the right surfactants—additives that change the foam’s surface tension—it’s possible to make aqueous foams that are actually stabilized by the presence of oil. This video explores some of the ways that oil can interact with these kinds of foam, beginning with capillary action, which draws the oil up into the junctions between foam films. For more, see Piroird and Lorenceau. (Video credit and submission: K. Piroird)

(via parametricworld)

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

Today in history: May 22, 1942 - Stjepan Filipović, a Croatian Partisan during World War II, was hanged by the fascists. 
As the rope was put around his neck, Filipović defiantly thrust his hands out and denounced the Germans and their Axis allies as murderers, shouting “Death to fascism, freedom to the people!” He urged the Yugoslav people to resist and implored them to never cease resisting. 
Filipović joined the workers’ movement in 1937, was arrested in 1939 and was sentenced to a year in prison. He joined the Communist Party of Yugoslavia in 1940 and was commander of a Partisan unit by 1941. He was captured on February 24, 1942 by Axis forces and hanged on May, 22, 1942. 
(image: famous photograph of Filipović with his arms in the air, moments before his death)
Via Freedom Road Socialist Organization (Fight Back!)

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

Today in history: May 22, 1942 - Stjepan Filipović, a Croatian Partisan during World War II, was hanged by the fascists.

As the rope was put around his neck, Filipović defiantly thrust his hands out and denounced the Germans and their Axis allies as murderers, shouting “Death to fascism, freedom to the people!” He urged the Yugoslav people to resist and implored them to never cease resisting.

Filipović joined the workers’ movement in 1937, was arrested in 1939 and was sentenced to a year in prison. He joined the Communist Party of Yugoslavia in 1940 and was commander of a Partisan unit by 1941. He was captured on February 24, 1942 by Axis forces and hanged on May, 22, 1942.

(image: famous photograph of Filipović with his arms in the air, moments before his death)

Via Freedom Road Socialist Organization (Fight Back!)

(Source: vbychkov, via parametricworld)

vizual-statistix:

Unlike like Emperor Kuzco, I was actually born with an innate sense of direction.  If you’re like me, and you use the Sun to navigate, you probably appreciate cities with gridded street plans that are oriented in the cardinal directions. If you know that your destination is due west, even if you hit a dead end or two, you’ll be able to get there. However, not all urban planners settled on such a simple layout for road networks. For some developers, topography or water may have gotten in the way. Others may not have appreciated the efficiency of the grid. This visualization assesses those road networks by comparing the relative degree to which they are gridded.
To generate the graphic, I first calculated the azimuth of every road in ten counties (plus one parish and D.C.). I tried to choose consolidated city-counties to keep the focus on urban centers, but for larger counties, I opted not to clip the shapefile to the city boundary. All calculations were made in a sinusoidal map projection using the central longitude of the area of interest. I then graphed the angles on rose diagrams (wind roses) using bins of 5° to show relative distributions for each area. The plots were scaled such that the maximum bar height was the same on each rose. To ensure rotational symmetry in the plots, each azimuth was counted twice: once using the original value and once using the opposite direction (e.g., 35° and 215°). As such, all streets, regardless of one-way or two-way traffic, were considered to be pointing in both directions.
The plots reveal some stark trends. Most of the counties considered do conform to a grid pattern. This is particularly pronounced with Chicago, even though much of Cook County is suburban. Denver, Jacksonville, Houston, and Washington, D.C., also have dominant grid patterns that are oriented in the cardinal directions. While Philadelphia and New York are primarily gridded, their orientations are slightly skewed from the traditional N-E-S-W bearings. Manhattan is particularly interesting because it has a notable imbalance between the number of streets running the width of the land (WNW to ESE) and the length of the land (NNE to SSW). New Orleans and San Francisco express some grid-like forms, but have a nontrivial proportion of roads that are rotated in other directions. Downtown Boston has some gridded streets, but the suburban grids are differently aligned, dampening the expression of a single grid on the rose diagram. Finally, the minimal geographic extents of the grids in Charlotte and Honolulu are completely overwhelmed by the winding roads of the suburbs, resulting in plots that show only slight favoritism for certain street orientations.
If you want to see more detail, a full-resolution version of this graphic can be downloaded here:
https://www.dropbox.com/s/my7y24hrzvhagce/Road_Orientation.png
Data source: http://www.census.gov/cgi-bin/geo/shapefiles2013/main
Script for azimuth calculation: http://www.ian-ko.com/free/free_arcgis.htm

vizual-statistix:

Unlike like Emperor Kuzco, I was actually born with an innate sense of direction.  If you’re like me, and you use the Sun to navigate, you probably appreciate cities with gridded street plans that are oriented in the cardinal directions. If you know that your destination is due west, even if you hit a dead end or two, you’ll be able to get there. However, not all urban planners settled on such a simple layout for road networks. For some developers, topography or water may have gotten in the way. Others may not have appreciated the efficiency of the grid. This visualization assesses those road networks by comparing the relative degree to which they are gridded.

To generate the graphic, I first calculated the azimuth of every road in ten counties (plus one parish and D.C.). I tried to choose consolidated city-counties to keep the focus on urban centers, but for larger counties, I opted not to clip the shapefile to the city boundary. All calculations were made in a sinusoidal map projection using the central longitude of the area of interest. I then graphed the angles on rose diagrams (wind roses) using bins of 5° to show relative distributions for each area. The plots were scaled such that the maximum bar height was the same on each rose. To ensure rotational symmetry in the plots, each azimuth was counted twice: once using the original value and once using the opposite direction (e.g., 35° and 215°). As such, all streets, regardless of one-way or two-way traffic, were considered to be pointing in both directions.

The plots reveal some stark trends. Most of the counties considered do conform to a grid pattern. This is particularly pronounced with Chicago, even though much of Cook County is suburban. Denver, Jacksonville, Houston, and Washington, D.C., also have dominant grid patterns that are oriented in the cardinal directions. While Philadelphia and New York are primarily gridded, their orientations are slightly skewed from the traditional N-E-S-W bearings. Manhattan is particularly interesting because it has a notable imbalance between the number of streets running the width of the land (WNW to ESE) and the length of the land (NNE to SSW). New Orleans and San Francisco express some grid-like forms, but have a nontrivial proportion of roads that are rotated in other directions. Downtown Boston has some gridded streets, but the suburban grids are differently aligned, dampening the expression of a single grid on the rose diagram. Finally, the minimal geographic extents of the grids in Charlotte and Honolulu are completely overwhelmed by the winding roads of the suburbs, resulting in plots that show only slight favoritism for certain street orientations.

If you want to see more detail, a full-resolution version of this graphic can be downloaded here:

https://www.dropbox.com/s/my7y24hrzvhagce/Road_Orientation.png

Data source: http://www.census.gov/cgi-bin/geo/shapefiles2013/main

Script for azimuth calculation: http://www.ian-ko.com/free/free_arcgis.htm

(via landscapearchitecture)

architecture-apprentice:

For the past few years Zaha Hadid’s Practice have been focusing their research efforts on the field of Parametricism. Simply put, they have been wanted to utilise digital technology to enable them to create complex forms. The exhibition showed work from the past year where they have focused on utilising this technology to create outer shells that reject firm, tectonic geometries in favour of organic, fluid forms.

architecture-apprentice:

For the past few years Zaha Hadid’s Practice have been focusing their research efforts on the field of Parametricism. Simply put, they have been wanted to utilise digital technology to enable them to create complex forms. The exhibition showed work from the past year where they have focused on utilising this technology to create outer shells that reject firm, tectonic geometries in favour of organic, fluid forms.

(via landscapearchitecture)

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